Tag Archives: lie-in

The Lie In, the Witch and the Wardrobe

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Hello there, dear reader!  How are you doing?  I’ve just made some biscuits, do you want one?  Careful, they’re still pretty hot.

Winter can be a magical time filled with joy, love and yummy food.  It can also be an absolute pain, complete with freakish weather situations, the stress of Christmas shopping and the inevitable do-we-don’t-we of turning on the central heating.  Here are some of the most common occurrences in the lives of twenty-somethings during the winter of our discontent (or disorganisation, in all likelihood):

  • The ‘where are we meeting?’ argument:
    “I don’t mind hosting.”
    “You’re just saying that because you don’t want to go outside.”
    “Well…yeah.  And I’ve got mulled wine here.”
    “Well played, my friend.  Well played”
  • The lie in:
    “I am NOT GETTING OUT OF BED until this house stops feeling like a BLOODY IGLOO.”
    “You’ve got work in forty minutes.”
    “Shh.  Inuits don’t have to get the Northern Line.”
  • The witch:
    “I’m not coming out tonight.”
    “Why not?”
    “Urgh.  I feel disgusting.  I’m so snotty.  My voice sounds all croaky and evil.”
    “You’ve got a cold.”
    “No, I’m dying.”
    “It’s just a cold.”
    “Were you not listening?  I feel like DEATH.  I’m not even sure that I’m HUMAN anymore.”
    “Yeah, you’re the whinging witch of the east.  Drink some Lemsip.”
  • The wardrobe:
    “It is SO COLD outside.  Should I wear tights or leggings?”
    “Tights UNDER leggings.”
    “You’re a genius.”
  • The transport issue:
    “Why did I wear tights under leggings?!  It’s hotter than Mount Doom on this bus!”
  • The prodigal glove:
    “I had two gloves last year.  I had two matching gloves.  A pair of gloves, in fact.   They live in that drawer.  Neither of them has had any reason to leave the drawer since February.  As far as I know, those gloves have been the best of friends for the past ten months.  One of them is here, in the drawer.  So where the HELL is the other one?  Did they have a row or something?!”
  • The festive season:
    “Have you started your Christmas shopping yet?”
    “Nope.”
    “Me neither.”
    “Amazon?”
    “Amazon.”
  • The festive reason:
    “We’ve only been going out for two weeks, but we were seeing each other for nearly three months before that, and technically we met over the Easter weekend, so should I buy him a Christmas present or not?”
    “I have no idea, but please throw your calendar away.  It’s creepy.”
  • The festive treason:
    “Have you started your Christmas shopping yet?”
    “Yep.  Everything’s bought, wrapped and safely hidden.”
    “I hate you.”

Have a lovely day.  Take a couple more biscuits for the road if you like.

Sunday Significance

Sunday

Hello, and happy Sunday to you!  I hope that you’ve had a nice lie-in after staying up to watch the football.  Or a nice lie-in after not staying up to watch the football, because you’re not really bothered about the World Cup, which is perfectly ok.  Basically, I hope you’ve had a nice lie-in.  Unless you’re meant to be at work, in which case I hope you got up on time…this has gotten out of hand.  Let’s carry on.

Sunday is a strange one, because traditionally it has been a day of rest and reverence for millions of years.  (I may be exaggerating the time frame slightly here, but I quite like the idea of dinosaurs going to church, for some reason.)  My many siblings and I were taken to Mass every single Sunday of our childhood, and it was the same routine every week, including the vague effort to dress smartly (“You can’t wear trainers to church.”  “But they’re clean!”  “Jesus wouldn’t wear trainers.”  “No, Jesus would wear flip-flops!!”).

These days, Sundays can involve anything.  As students we used Sundays for recovery, for pub lunches, last-minute essay-writing and part-time jobs.  As graduates Sundays became opportunities to catch up on favourite television shows, quality time with friends and loved ones or just another work day.  To be honest, as an adult my main identifier of Sundays is that I always need something from the supermarket at 5.05 pm, by which point I may as well be in the Arctic for all the shops that are available.  My, how things have changed.

In honour of the original idea behind Sunday (i.e., the Sabbath/a rest day), I would like us all to take it easy and just share a few bits of interesting and Sunday-related information.

  • The Monkees’ 1967 hit Pleasant Valley Sunday was co-written by then-married Gerry Goffin and Carole King (this is a few years before King became famous on her own), and it was supposedly inspired by the road they lived on at the time.  That must have been super awkward when the neighbours heard the lyrics.
  • The most expensive sundae in the world costs $1,000 and has to be ordered 2 days in advance.  Yes, really.  It’s this one here.
  • The actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers likes to clean his house on a Sunday morning.
  • Billie Holliday’s 1941 cover of the “Hungarian Suicide Song” Gloomy Sunday was banned because apparently it was bad for war morale.  Instrumental versions were still allowed, though.
  • Michael J Fox once said “I’m going to marry a Jewish woman, because I like the idea of getting up Sunday morning and going to the deli.”  He did, too.

Whatever you’re up to, have a brilliant Sunday.  See you tomorrow.